A better way (and script) to add a Service Principal in Azure for VSTS

From Visual Studio Team Services (VSTS) it’s possible to deploy to an Azure Subscription using an Active Directory Service Principal.

The Microsoft documentation refers to a blog post which describes a 3-clicks and a manual way to setup this principal.

For both the suggested ways (3-clicks or manual), there are some concerns from my side about the principal setup, which I think they could be improved:

  • The principal which is created during the process gets the “Contributor” role granted on the whole Azure subscription, and using the manual powershell script, the default role is even “Owner” (this can be modified).
  • The name of the Active Directory Application/Principal is some random guid which is difficult to be identified, see this picture:

Continue reading “A better way (and script) to add a Service Principal in Azure for VSTS”

Demystifying .NET Core SDK versions

Last night I was developing some code in .NET Core for the Dutch Azure Meetup and I was (again) encountering versioning problems and unexpected behavior.

I found this blog post which describes in some way the same problem I had.

Update 13-01-2017: I found this blog which also describes very well the issue.

What the blog post says is that if you use:

and you want use a specific version of .NET Core SDK you should add a global.json file (before executing the “dotnet new” command) like this:

The SDK’s in Windows are installed in the Program Files folder (or Program Files (x86) if you have a 32bit Windows) so let’s take a look there:


The following SDK’s are installed om my machine:

  • 1.0.0-preview2-003131
  • 1.0.0-preview2-003133
  • 1.0.0-preview2-003156
  • 1.0.0-preview4-004233
  • 1.0.0-preview2-1-003177

But how I know which SDK belongs to which .NET Core version? Continue reading “Demystifying .NET Core SDK versions”